Our blueprint for urban transport can deliver transformational change

Tobyn Hughes, Managing Director of Nexus and Chair of the Urban Transport Group, offers his thoughts on our new report – Policy Futures for urban transport.

Over the coming few weeks the major political parties will be getting together to debate their policies for the next few years. Ensuring our urban economies can grow in a sustainable and inclusive way has to be a key part of those debates. We believe modern and efficient transport networks can be the link between policy objectives and delivered results.

Very few other services brings together – or facilitates the success of – the goals of many government departments and agencies. The Urban Transport Group calculated that in 2014 local bus services alone contributed to the policy goals of half of all government departments and 46 policy goals of those departments (41 outside of the DfT).

That’s why we are launching our latest Policy Futures vision – a blueprint that can lead to transformational change for everything from economic development, social mobility and inclusion through to creating the cities we will need for the future.

At its heart, the Policy Futures vision requires a national framework that brings together government and civil service at the national level with the urban transport authorities delivering services in their local areas. Potentially, the barriers between departments and agencies can be lessened so that the benefits that joined-up transport thinking might be realised – in such disparate policy areas such as health, employment and education.

Not only that, a national framework could also deliver real economic and budgetary goals – funding decisions for transport schemes and infrastructure can be streamlined and made more efficient enabling transport authorities to have more control over a more stable funding regime. A more focussed transport framework will unlock additional job opportunities by helping people get into work and increase the skills base of the population by easing access to education and training.

The Policy Futures vision has 16 specific policy changes we would like to see implemented – I won’t list them here, but we will be on hand at the Labour and Conservative party conferences to explain them in detail.

Our member authorities deliver vital urban transport services for millions of people  in the UK – and we hope to make their voices, and the voices of our members heard this party conference season.

 

Fostering Trust for Total Transport

Here at UTG, we’ve been talking about Total Transport for a long time, with our flagship report on this in 2011. And then, in 2015, DfT announced funding for a series of Total Transport Pilots, eventually funding 37 projects in 36 areas. These two year pilot projects, focused on rural areas, are now coming to an end, but much can be learnt from the successes and failures of these projects. A recent CIHT event focused on this very area.

For me, the highlight of the event was hearing directly from the authorities developing the Total Transport Pilots, both Devon County Council and Northamptonshire presented on the day.

In Northamptonshire they have taken a data driven approach to understanding the current transport needs in the region and identifying how a Total Transport approach might help to make operations more efficient. Uniquely within the pilots, the Network Northamptonshire project has established a Community Interest Company to deliver their project, allowing more room to innovate and try out different things, and also offering the opportunity to generate profits which can be re-invested in transport. They emphasise the need for leadership buy-in for a successful project of this kind.

Within Devon, the focus has been on improving health related transport. This has been undertaken by moving patient transport into the County Council’s Transport Coordination Service and changing the way that patient transport is commissioned. This has resulted in a reduction in complaints about patient transport to PALS, showing positive improvements in service delivery. But working with health has not been easy, and establishing effective working relationships was important in laying the foundations for this coordination.

We’ve recent produced a report with the Community Transport Association, looking at how Total Transport approaches can improve delivery of non-emergency patient transport. This included highlighting good practice examples from the pilot projects, such as Northamptonshire and Devon County Council.

There are clearly many barriers to Total Transport approaches, and these pilot projects have demonstrated this. But developing these projects as pilots have allowed partners to be creative and innovative, identifying the barriers and challenges throughout.

One thing that particularly struck me at the CIHT event was the recurrence of the theme of trust. Trust between partners was identified as critical to successful projects, particularly where cross-sectoral working was required. Working across transport and health has repeatedly been shown to be challenging, not just for Total Transport. Fostering effective relationships is at the heart of successful Total Transport approaches, and these pilot projects have shown that without trust, this may not succeed.